Saturday, July 30, 2016

DEMOCRACY IS BEING SMOTHERED IN AMERICA


THE DILEMMA IS THAT SANDERS FELT HE HAD NO CHOICE BUT TO ENDORSE CLINTON.

BUT HISTORY WILL REMIND OUR DESCENDANTS THAT ONE MAN SPOKE THE TRUTH AND THE PEOPLE LET HIM FALL.

THE SO-CALLED "DEMOCRATS" HAVE BETRAYED THE AMERICAN PEOPLE WITH THEIR TRICKS AND LIES. THEY HAVE BROUGHT SHAME TO THE WORD "DEMOCRACY".

Thursday, July 28, 2016

DONALD TRUMP'S SONS KILL ANIMALS FOR FUN

Donald Trump defending sons' sport killing may doom campaign - Bad press has been fertilizer to Donald Trump's popularity. But defending his sons' killing exotic animals for sport may doom his campaign.
NYDAILYNEWS.COM

Saturday, July 23, 2016

I THINK TRUMP IS PLAYING WITH AMERICA


I THINK THE ELECTIONS ARE A GAME FOR TRUMP. 

HE IS LIKE THE LEADER OF NORTH KOREA, PLAYING WITH THE PEOPLE AS IF THEY WERE HIS PUPPETS. 

TRUMP IS WALLOWING IN THE POWER HE HAS TO MAKE THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE LICK HIS SHOES AND HOP, SKIP AND JUMP FOR HIM. 

WHAT FOOLS THESE MORTALS BE.

AMERICA'S REAL FIRST LADY

Eleanor Roosevelt Biography
Diplomat, U.S. First Lady (1884–1962)

The wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt changed the role of the first lady through her active participation in American politics.

QUOTES
"The political influence that was attributed to me was nil where my husband was concerned ...If I felt strongly about anything, I told Franklin, since he had the power to do things and I did not, but he did not always feel as I felt."
—Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt - Mini Biography (TV-14; 4:15) A short biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, who became one of the most outspoken First Ladies in the White House. She became politically active by writing a newspaper column and drafting the UN Bill on Human Rights.

Synopsis
Born in New York City on October 11, 1884, Eleanor Roosevelt—the niece of Theodore Roosevelt—was one of the most outspoken women in the White House. She married Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1905. During her husband's presidency, Eleanor gave press conferences and wrote a newspaper column. After his death, she served at the United Nations, focusing on human rights and women's issues.

Early Life
First lady, writer and humanitarian Eleanor Roosevelt was born Anna Eleanor Roosevelt on October 11, 1884, in New York City. The niece of President Theodore Roosevelt, Eleanor was known as a shy child, and experienced tremendous loss at a young age: Her mother died in 1892 and her father died two years later, when she was just 10 years old. Eleanor was sent to school in England when she was a teenager—an experience that helped draw her out of her shell.

In 1905, Eleanor married her distant cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who would later become president of the United States. The couple had six children: Anna, James, Franklin (who died as an infant), Elliott, Franklin Jr. and John. Despite her busy home life, Eleanor became active in public service during World War I, working for the American Red Cross.

U.S. First Lady
After her husband suffered a polio attack in 1921, Eleanor stepped forward to help Franklin with his political career. When her husband became president in 1933, Eleanor dramatically changed the role of the first lady. Not content to stay in the background and handle domestic matters, she showed the world that the first lady was an important part of American politics. She gave press conferences and spoke out for human rights, children's causes and women's issues, working on behalf of the League of Women Voters. She even had her own newspaper column, "My Day." She also focused on helping the country's poor, stood against racial discrimination and, during World War II, traveled abroad to visit U.S. troops.

For her active role in public policy, Eleanor was heavily criticized by some. She was praised by others, however, and today, she is regarded by as a leader of women's and civil rights, as well as one of the first public officials to publicize important issues through the mass media.

Life After the White House
Following her husband's death, on April 12, 1945, Eleanor told interviewers that she didn't have plans for continuing her public service: "The story is over," she reportedly stated. However, the opposite would actually prove to be true. President Harry Truman appointed Eleanor as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly, a position in which she served from 1945 to 1953. She became chair of the U.N.'s Human Rights Commission and helped to write the Universal Declaration of Human Rights—an effort that she considered to be her greatest achievement.

President John F. Kennedy reappointed her to the United States delegation to the U.N. in 1961, and later appointed her to the National Advisory Committee of the Peace Corps and to chair the President's Commission on the Status of Women.

Outside of her political work, Eleanor wrote several books about her life and experiences, including This Is My Story (1937), This I Remember (1949), On My Own (1958) and Autobiography (1961).

Death and Legacy
Eleanor died of aplastic anemia, tuberculosis and heart failure on November 7, 1962, at the age of 78. She was buried at the family estate in Hyde Park. A revolutionary first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the most outspoken women to live in the White House. While she's had her share of critics, most agree that she was a great humanitarian who dedicated much of her life to fighting for political and social change.

Friday, July 22, 2016

DANGER FROM MODERN LIGHT BULBS

Important  
share with everyone




Warning from the British Ministry of health about Energy Saving bulbs.

These types of bulbs which are called Energy Saving or low Energy bulbs, if broken, cause serious danger!
So much so, that if one breaks, everybody will have to leave the room for at least 15 minutes, because it contains Mercury (poisonous) which causes migraine, disorientation, imbalances and different other health problems, when inhaled.

It causes many people with allergies, severe skin conditions and other diseases just by touching this substance or inhaling it.

Also the ministry warned to NOT clean the debris of the broken bulb with a vacuum cleaner,

because it would spread the contamination to other rooms in the house when using the vacuum cleaner again.

It must be cleaned up with a normal broom or brush, be kept in a sealed bag and disposed of right away from the house in a bin for hazardous materials.
 
Notice: Mercury is dangerous, more poisonous than lead or arsenic!!!!


 

ALBIE SACHS LOST AN ARM AND GAINED A NATION


Albie Sachs and family.

Albie Sachs, with his wife Vanessa and their four-year-old son, Oliver. 
Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

Patrick Barkham @patrick_barkham

In Mozambique in 1988, Albie Sachs was nearly killed by a car bomb. The anti-apartheid campaigner lost his right arm and was blinded in his left eye. Ever since, he says, life has been like a fable. "Until then I was just another one of thousands of people in exile who had been in the struggle. The bomb for me introduced the element of madness [you find] in fable," says Sachs, when we meet this week in London.
 
"To wake up without an arm but to feel joyously alive, to learn to do everything – to sit up, to stand, to walk, to run, to write again. Every little detail became a moment of discovery and breakthrough. I had an absolute conviction that as I got better, my country got better."
 
It's perhaps for this reason that he gave his account of the assassination attempt, and his recovery, the striking title The Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter.
 
When Sachs wrote the memoir about his rehabilitation, he was a lawyer in exile and it was far from certain that apartheid would be replaced by stable democracy. After the publication in 1990, the fable of South Africa and Sachs unfolded in unexpected directions and now, aged 76, Sachs has added several postscripts to his story. After recuperating in London, he returned to South Africa and played a key role in drafting its democratic constitution. Nelson Mandela made him a judge in the new constitutional court, where Sachs made a number of landmark rulings, including recognising gay marriage. If the car bomb precipitated a kind of rebirth for Sachs, he has also been granted a second go at fatherhood. "That sense of one fabulous episode after another has continued and then finally, as in all good fables, the guy gets the bride," he says, speaking easily in the immaculately modulated tones of a – recently retired – judge. After meeting his second wife, Vanessa, they had a son, Oliver. "He's been a total delight. So I now have a son of 41, a son of 40 and one of four."
 
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An instantly recognisable figure in Cape Town, Sachs lives close to the beach where he and Oliver hang out together wearing Panama hats. "It's big Albie and little Albie, and he's kind of sparky. He's got presence," smiles Sachs. They play football and snakes and ladders and every Saturday visit their local cafe for chocolate croissants and cranberry juice. In this idyllic second fatherhood, there is just one dilemma: how does he explain his arm, and apartheid, to his young son?
 
Sachs was born into a fervently political Jewish family. His father Soli was a renowned trade unionist who fought against racism in South Africa. "I had a father who was in the news a lot. My emotions were mixed. It was mainly pride," he says. Soli, who was separated from Sachs's mother, was fairly remote. "In many ways he was the guy behind the newspaper – I saw the top of his head sticking out and his knees underneath." During the second world war, Sachs received a postcard from his father: "'Dear Albert, congratulations on your sixth birthday. May you grow up to be a soldier in the fight for liberation.' Now that's fantastic and it's heavy. I would never send Oliver a postcard like that."
 
Sachs was more hands-on with his sons, Alan and Michael, from his first marriage to fellow freedom fighter Stephanie Kemp. The couple had both been imprisoned for opposing apartheid; after they were released, they moved to London, living there in the 1970s and 80s, until Sachs went to work in Mozambique. When he was blown up in the capital, Maputo, the African National Congress (ANC) immediately flew Alan and Michael to see their father, which was wonderful, he says. The fact that the bomb, fixed under his car by the South African security service, had not killed him left him feeling buoyant rather than angry. But were his London-born boys furious with their father for putting himself in harm's way – or were they at least more angry than he was with the racist secret agents who tried to kill him? Sachs thinks not. "We used to speak about the regime, the system. It wasn't personalised in that sense. It was apartheid. You pick up a lot from your parents – rancour, anger, hatred. Maybe spending time with me and seeing that I was just joyous ... I don't know. You would have to ask them, but there's nothing that makes me suspect [they were angry]."
 
In hospital, Sachs received a note from a freedom fighter friend that read: "Don't worry, comrade Albie, we will avenge you." He was dismayed. "What does he mean? We're going to cut off the arms and blind in one eye the people who did this?" Soon after the attack, Sachs heard that a man had been apprehended over the bomb plot and, for the first time, the concept of soft vengeance came to him. "I said to myself, if he's put on trial and the evidence is insufficient and he is acquitted, that would be my soft vengeance – living under the rule of law. And if we get freedom and democracy, that will be my soft vengeance." Sachs never found out what happened to the suspect, but he got his wish. "The whole achievement of our wonderful new democratic constitution is soft vengeance. It totally smites the horror, the division, the hatreds, the separations of apartheid but it does so in a way that is benign and creative and humanising. It's a far more profound vengeance than doing to them what they did to us."
 
Sachs possesses a remarkable ability to extract positive emotions from wounding events; he even sees his near death as having a galvanising effect on his sons. "South Africa was like a dread country in which both its parents had been locked up," he says. The assassination attempt inspired both to visit South Africa for the first time. Michael, who had left school at 16, then enrolled in an ANC school in Tanzania. Both now live in South Africa. Alan – "very talented, very quiet, thoughtful" – is an artist; Michael a developmental economist. If they ever struggled with having such a public figure for a father, then Sachs does not know about it. Besides, he says, proudly: "For a long time I was Soli's son. Now I've become Michael's father. Michael Sachs is very well known in Johannesburg. For anyone under 45, I'm Michael's dad. For anyone over 80, I'm Soli's son. So there's that little window in between where I'm Albie. I'm proud of those identities."
 
There is a small voice in the distance.
 
"Albie, can I come to you?"
 
"Do you want to come to us?" Sachs calls back to his son.
 
"I want to come to you," says Oliver, who at nearly five already boasts a lawyer's precise grasp of language.
 
Oliver joins us, followed by Vanessa, who is 45. It seems a good moment to ask how they met. Sachs insists that his wife tells the story.
 
In 1992, Vanessa was invited to a party by a mixed-race friend who had been living with an older white man for 12 years. To avoid arrest during apartheid, the friend pretended to be a maid so they could live in the same house. "I didn't remember specifically meeting Albie but three months after, the host told my friend that Albie was quite taken with me," says Vanessa. So she read a copy of Soft Vengeance. "I fell in love with the narrator, partly because he was so sensuous and in touch with his emotions and vulnerable and fragile in expressing that," she says.
 
Sachs describes himself as a feminist and is clearly powerfully attracted to women: he admits in Soft Vengeance to falling in love with many of the nurses, psychiatrists and occupational therapists who helped his recovery. Did Vanessa fear he was a bit of a ladies' man? "I saw that as part of his recovery. I didn't see myself in that role in my attraction to him," she laughs. "What did help the attraction was that on the cover of the book was a very striking photo of Albie. That helped me in my fantasies."
 
Vanessa kept a copy by her bedside and, three years later, bumped into Sachs at an airport. She introduced herself "and I realised people do that to him all the time – go up to him and say hello, and he tries to remember," she says. "He pretended he remembered." She then engineered a dinner party "to see if he was like the man in the book. And if there was any chemistry." They swapped numbers. Vanessa thought she would wait seven days before calling; Sachs phoned after three. They eventually got together at a New Year's Eve party thrown by the British high commission. "It was a bit like a fairytale really," she says.
 
"I never really thought of it – The Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter brought us together," says Sachs. "One of the purposes of literature is to ..."
 
"... crawl into women's hearts," finishes Vanessa, with another laugh.
 
Oliver is politically precocious – as a toddler he could recognise Nelson Mandela – but his parents don't talk to him about politics. "It's a much more normal upbringing than I had," says Sachs. Two weeks ago, however, Sachs was stunned when conversation turned to guns. "I said, 'Do you like guns, Oliver?' And he said, 'Yeeess!'" Sachs mimics the pure joy of a four-year-old gun lover. "I said, 'Guns are terrible, they are used for killing people.' And he said, 'But, Daddy, you used guns when fighting for freedom.' Now I've never told him that. I don't know where he got it from. We don't discuss things like that."
 
The one occasion when they discussed the violence of the past was last year, when Sachs took Oliver to the spot in Maputo where he was blown up. "The idea was I would explain to Oliver why his daddy looks different," says Sachs. "I wanted him to know directly from me at the place where the explosion took place. And we sat down where my body ended up, next to where the car exploded, and I cradled him, using my left arm to hold him. I explained to him I came out of the apartment," he makes a swooping motion with his right arm, "and I was about to enter my car and 'boooom' suddenly everything went dark. And I found I could explain how I was taken to hospital and how I'm very strong now. Then I wanted to explain who did this, and why, and I couldn't talk to him about that – how people disrespected other people so much because they didn't have the same appearance. It seemed like pulling him back into so much ugliness. I felt it would be just wrong. All I could say was, they were cruel people who did this."
 
The balance between remembering and forgetting and passing on memories of struggle to a new generation is a subtle one for Sachs and for South Africa. "There is so much we take for granted and it's wonderful we take it for granted and it's terrible we take it for granted," he says. "It's wonderful that we have free and fair elections every five years and our president steps down after two terms and people speak their minds. In fact, the biggest growth industry in South Africa today is standup comedians. What is terrible is that it is as though it just came to pass." The creation of the new South Africa, in which Sachs has played such a role, has "the sense of surprise, amazement, of a miracle", he says, "but every single detail was planned and worked for. I used to think that when we got freedom we'd have no more meetings. And then we had more meetings. Freedom isn't miracles ... It was just persistence."
 
During apartheid, he and Vanessa would not have been allowed to kiss, let alone marry. "I don't want to even discuss that with Oliver. I don't want him to know his mummy and daddy could ever have been separated in that way," says Sachs. "I've written quite a lot – maybe one day he can pick up the books when he feels like it. I don't want him to feel having a parent who is in the public eye as a weight, as something he has to carry around with him."
 
Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter by Albie Sachs is published by Souvenir  theguardian.com/bookshop or call 0330 333 6846


MONTREAL POLICE ARE DEAF AND DUMB TO THEIR OWN CRIMES


More than 262,000 people from Canada to China have read my reports, but there is still no justice for Victims of the Montreal Police. 

The Montreal Police helped Dawn McSweeney rob me and destroy my family and, to this day, they still ignore their complicity in these crimes. 

And so I fight on night and day, exposing the corruption in the Montreal Police Department. 

Montreal Mayor, Michael Applebaum awaits trial on multiple charges of crime and corruption and a few of his accomplices have already pleaded guilty, but no one mentions the corruption among the Montreal Police. 

Time goes by and they think I will forget and give up, but I never will. I keep reporting the truth and they have no argument so they are deaf to my pleas and dumb - mute. 

My reports will stay before the eyes of the public as long as there are clouds in the sky. They are open to the world.

http://dawnmcsweeney.blogspot.com

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

YOUNG NEGROES DENIED OPPORTUNITIES

 
YOUNG KIDS WITH DARK SKINS ARE BEING MURDERED IN THE NAME OF THE LAW. SOME SAY IT IS BECAUSE THEY COMMIT CRIMES AND THEY HAVE NO HOPE BECAUSE SOCIETY REFUSES TO LET THEM IN, REFUSES TO PROVIDE EQUAL OPPORTUNITY. YEARS AGO, IN MONTREAL,CANADA, I REACHED OUT AND OFFERED TO HELP YOUNG NEGRO KIDS LEARN TO SPEAK ENGLISH WELL AND HOW TO PRESENT THEMSELVES WHEN APPLYING FOR JOBS, HOW TO DRESS AND HOW TO WRITE LETTERS OF APPLICATION. I WAS NOT ASKING FOR ANY PAYMENT. MY OFFER WAS TOSSED IN MY FACE BY THE COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, DAN PHILIP.
 
PHYLLIS CARTER'S JOURNAL
Building Camelot One Essay At A Time
 
THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014
 
BITING OFF ONE'S NOSE TO SPITE ONE'S FACE - THE BACKSIDE OF BIGOTRY
 
The April 2014, The Senior Times newspaper published in Montreal, features an article on "Longtime human-rights activist Dan Philip." The story tells us that Philip cares about issues of social justice. The 77 year-old Philip is associated with the Black Coalition of Canada and the Ligue des Noirs du Quebec. He has been a well-known activist in the Province of Quebec for decades.
 
Coming upon the article, I was moved to reveal my own experience with Dan Philip. Bigotry works both ways. At first, I put the newspaper aside, not wanting to dig up old disappointments. The man is so highly-regarded in Montreal. Why bother exposing him now?
 
But the story kept eating at me. Iconoclast. Yes. Something in me cannot abide covering up truth, especially when people are throwing confetti over a person who has hidden his own bigotry.
 
It isn't that Philip offended me. That would be easy to brush off. The offence that I cannot forget is the fact that Philip's prejudice deprived many young coloured people in Montreal of opportunities I wanted to provide for them.
 
Many years ago, I went to Dan Philip's storefront office on Decarie Blvd. to offer my help to the young people of the "Black" community.
 
The word "Black" used to describe people of colour always bothers me. Most Negro people are brown-skinned. "Black" is a political term associated with the hatred, anti-Semitism and violence of the American Black Panthers. Most people of colour are not violent and do not deserve to be stuck with that association. My husband told me that, when he was a young man in New York City, the appellation,"Black", was always followed with "bastard". He said he was a coloured man - and how I loved that coloured man!
 
 
Back to my meeting with Dan Philip. I offered to mentor, teach and counsel Dan Philip's people. I offered to teach young people to speak English well, to fill out applications for jobs. I offered to teach them how to prepare and present themselves at interviews. I would teach people at no cost and for no benefits or considerations.
 
Dan Philip did not ask me a single question. He just refused me and showed me the door. Why?
 
Dan Philip did not know me. I had never met him, although I remember that my father, George Rubin, knew him, and I think my dad thought well of him. But Dan Philip did not know me. Why did he refuse my heartfelt gift. I did so want to help.
 
There was only one thing Dan Philip knew about me. I sat facing him. My face was white.
 
Since then, I have been English Speech Consultant - teacher, counsellor, mentor and friend - to doctors, scientists and ministers from Korea, Japan and China. I still keep in touch with some of my students who are people I greatly admire.
 
I feel sad when I read about "Black" youngsters being involved in drugs and crime. I feel frustrated when I hear people say "The kids never had a chance to learn better."
 
Many did, and Dan Philip spit on their opportunity.
 
I do not forget.

  http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_kgLIJKKEvnY/Su2qdvMH5HI/AAAAAAAAAAM/F21ZUKwI_NU/s1600-h/CLIFF+AND+SHEBA+SARI-753341.JPG
 
Cliff Carter, Mr. Nostalgia
and
Phyllis Carter, The Sheba


THE FIFTH INK SPOT


Bill Kenny called Cliff, "The Fifth Ink Spot". 

Luckey Roberts was Cliff's Godfather.

Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Cozy Cole, The Mills Brothers, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Harry James and Betty Grable. Fats Waller, Eubie Blake, Lena Horne - They were a part of Cliff's world before I met him in 1947.

I was fortunate - blessed - to share Cliff's world for decades.

I miss him every day.

BLOODY LADY GAGA

  IF YOU SEE HER, CROSS THE STREET

Lady Gaga in her $24,000 Armani rabbit fur coat (confirmed real) a few days ago. Gaga, like the Kardashians, is fully aware of the gruesome process of skinning animals alive to make fur coats and still buys them. She wasn't "born this way." She is just cruel this way and is not a animal lover like she claims ...

ENGLAND'S NEW LEADER THREATENS NUCLEAR HOLOCAUST


Theresa May confirms she is prepared to kill 100,000 men, women and children in a nuclear strike

Theresa May vowed to pull the trigger and launch Trident if it came to it as she accused Labour of 'defending the country's enemies'
 
Britain's new Prime Minister tonight confirmed she was ready to annihilate millions of people in a nuclear strike.

Theresa May vowed to pull the trigger and launch the UK's Trident missiles against an enemy if it came to it - as Labour continued to tear itself apart over renewing the country's ultimate weapon.

Jeremy Corbyn was poised to vote against building four new submarines to replace the ageing Vanguard fleet at a cost of £31bn – despite constructing new subs being Labour's official position.

But buoyed by supportive comments from Labour MPs, the Tory Prime Minister blasted Mr Corbyn and Caroline Lucas ahead of tonight's 10pm vote.

How did my MP vote on renewing Trident? Search by name or constituency after heated nuclear debate

"Sadly she and some members of the Labour party seem to be the first to defend the country's enemies," she declared - prompting a furious response from the Green MP.

Theresa May said there was no option other than to say she'd pull the trigger
The Commons was set to back replacing the four Royal Navy's nuclear-armed boats in the face of opposition from some leading Labour MPs, a handful of Tory rebels, the SNP and Lib Dems.
 
The Prime Minister was asked if she would give the order to fire the Trident D5 missile knowing it would inflict mass casualties.

SNP MP George Kerevan said: "Is she prepared to authorise a nuclear strike that would kill hundreds of thousands of men, women and children?"

Mrs May replied simply: "Yes."

And she said it was wrong of Jeremy Corbyn to say he would not pull the trigger on the "ultimate insurance" policy in a dangerous world.

She tried to exploit Labour divisions over giving the green light to Successor subs.

Mrs May tried to exploit Labour divisions over the party's nuclear weapons policy

She said: "I think it is a great pity that there are members of the Labour Party 's front bench today who fail to see the necessity of this nuclear deterrent, given that the Labour Party in the past has put the British national interest first in looking at this issue."

Senior Labour MP John Woodcock, who represents Barrow where the submarines will be built, told Mrs May it remained "steadfastly" the party's policy to retain the deterrent.

He added: "Many of my colleagues will do the right thing for the long-term security of our nation and vote to complete the programme that we ourselves started in government."

She accused Caroline Lucas and Labour MPs of "defending the country's enemies"

Veteran anti-nuclear campaigner Mr Corbyn outlined his opposition to Trident, and has repeatedly said he would not authorise a strike if he was in No 10.

"I would not take a decision that kills millions of innocent people," he said.
 
"I do not believe the threat of mass murder is a legitimate way to go about international relations."

He told MPs it was "time for us to step up to the plate" on nuclear disarmament.

He declared: "Do these Weapons of Mass Destruction, for that is what they are, act as a deterrent to what we face? And is that deterrent credible?"

Mr Corbyn was supported by Tory Foreign Affairs Committee chairman Crispin Blunt, who attacked the cost and blasted his party for politicising the vote.

"This is a political weapon aimed rather effectively at the Labour party ," he said.

The independent House of Commons Library today outlined the enormous costs of renewing Trident.

It showed the first concept phase had a £905m budget, followed by a £3.9bn assessment phase and £31bn cost of building the subs - with a £10bn contingency.

The costs of running the submarines is currently around £2.1bn a year.
Over the life of the fleet, with inflation, this could be between £70.4bn at one estimate at £140.5bn at another.

At the higher estimate, and if the contingency is used up, this could total more than £180billion.

Jeremy Corbyn was continually hit by pro-Trident comments from his own MPs

But Mrs May told Mr Corbyn: "The whole point of a deterrent is that our enemies need to know that we would be prepared to (use it) - unlike some suggestions that we could have a nuclear deterrent but not actually be willing to use it, which come from the Labour Party frontbench."

Mr Corbyn pointed to his overwhelming victory in the 2015 leadership race which followed his passionate attack in nuclear weapons.

Defying his own party's policy, he pointed to his personal support, telling one of his MPs: "He's as well aware as I am of what the existing policy is.

"He's also as well aware as I am of the views that I put forward in the leadership election last year, on my views on nuclear weapons."

19 JUL 2016
BY BEN GLAZE , DAN BLOOM
News UK News Labour Party

AMERICA - REPUBLICANS OBJECT TO "BLACK LIVES MATTER"


Since when do The People in a free country have to submit to abuse in silence? 

Since when has it been "American" to accept racism, bigotry, murder, without rising up to protest? 

Peaceful protest is a basic human right and, today, in America, that right is being shameless threatened. 

Without the right to peaceful protest, you have Hitler's Germany. 

And when people – who have fought for freedom far across the seas and whose loved ones have died fighting for freedom – when those people are not allowed peaceful protest, they will have to resort to violence – civil war in America – or die as the Jews died in Nazi Germany.

Monday, July 18, 2016

PERSONAL CAMERAS HAVE CHANGED THE GAME - NOW WE HAVE PROOF


Comments
Phyllis Carter

PERSONAL CAMERAS HAVE CHANGED THE GAME. FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, "COMMON PEOPLE" CAN EXPOSE CRIMINALS TO THE WORLD IN A FEW SECONDS. IN THE PAST, THE PEOPLE HAD NO HOPE. IT WAS ALWAYS THEIR WORD AGAINST THE LIARS. NOW CRIMINALS KNOW SOMEONE IS WATCHING - THE WORLD IS. 

WHEN I WAS ATTACKED AND ROBBED IN MY HOME WITH THE HELP OF A MONTREAL POLICE OFFICER, THERE WERE NO CAMERAS. I WAS A 60 YEAR OLD CANCER PATIENT WHEN THIS CRIME OCCURRED. SINCE THEN THE MONTREAL POLICE HAVE REFUSED TO TAKE LEGAL ACTION AGAINST THE CRIMINAL - DAWN MCSWEENEY - AND THE MONTREAL POLICE OFFICER WHO HELPED HER ROB ME AND MY ELDERLY PARENTS. 

MORE THAN 260,000 PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD HAVE READ MY DETAILED REPORTS BUT THERE IS STILL NO JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF THE MONTREAL POLICE. AND SO I FIGHT ON DAY AND NIGHT FOR JUSTICE.- 


DAWNMCSWEENEY.BLOGSPOT.COM|BY PHYLLIS CARTER